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Step into Artist Joan Miró’s Mallorca Studio

Spain’s famed surrealist artist, Joan Miró, moved from his native city of Barcelona to his workspace studio in Palma de Mallorca in 1954, where he experienced his most productive artistic period until his death there, in 1983.

Named after the architect Josep Lluís Sert, who designed the Pavilion of the Spanish Republic for the Paris World’s Fair in 1937, Miró’s art studio is a white, concrete structure, quite unlike the traditional clay or stone houses of Mallorca, or the wider Mediterranean.

Not only that, but all of the art studio’s façades have red, blue, or yellow painted door and window surfaces, that tie in with the time’s Modernist aesthetics, influenced by Le Corbusier and infused with an almost Mondrian-esque colour scheme.

Inside artist Miró’s Mallorcan studio, the L-shaped floorplan is laid out on two levels and covered by a vaulted roof. Very much human-sized, it’s here that Mirò worked on his pieces and stored them, sometimes for years, in order to gain distance and rework them.

Today, Miró’s studio is open to visitors, who can roam about here, among Mirò’s finished and unfinished paintings, his drawings, his oils, his watercolours, paint brushes and sponges, his newspaper clippings and his collection of found objects such as stones, postcards, butterflies, shells and folkloric artifacts.

Despite the region’s recent building boom, the studio’s atmosphere is supremely peaceful, and it is located only a 45 minute drive from the Son Brull Hotel and Spa – a White Line Hotels haven on the island.

Mirò’s artwork, in which the recurring symbols stars, women and birds can be found, lives on around the world in museums, galleries and collector’s homes. But mostly, it lives on here in the artist’s Mallorca studio, where the paint-splattered floors give the impression that Miró’s spirit is still very much present.

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